The OutHouse History

This information was lifted off the OutHouse website before it disappeared.

1983
Nottingham City Council - Labour Group majority of 1 - Equal Opportunities Committee;
Gay Men's subgroup - Gay 5 and Gay 12;
Consultations with the community - main objective - a community centre

1985
August 28th : Founding Meeting of The Nottingham Gay Peoples Centre Co-operative Society
28 members;
Set out to raise awareness, raise funds, raise community spirit;
Trips to neighbouring towns, weekends away, casino night, bingo, video/ games evenings, treasure hunt, draws;
Recognition sought from and granted by Nottingham City Council;
 
1986
Name changed to Nottingham Lesbian and Gay Community Centre;
Theatre trips, Peace Festival, Pink Elephant Stall! Lake District holiday, forest ramble, Christmas lunch;
Standing order forms start to bring in a regular income - some original pledges continue in 2001;
Best of friends - Perspectives Theatre Company - our first joint venture;
Visit to South Wales Lesbian and Gay Co-operative Society;
Much support from Ben Benson ( Nottingham City Council ) providing our first feasibility report;
First grant application - Inner Area Programme: Capital £133,000 - £165,000, Revenue £22,000
First Lesbian and Gay Festival: films, theatre and a treasure hunt!;
August - assets exceed £1000 for the first time;
October - our 100th member joins the society;
Music Hall event - a tremendous success, as was 'The Elevator' by Troupe de Doris;
 
1987
Links established with gay groups in Nottingham's twinned towns of Minsk and Karlsruhe;
Holiday away in the Manifold Valley, Derbyshire;
Nottingham Central Library display;
Sponsored swim by 82 year old member;
Approach by local gay businessman to run a commercial gay club on one floor with our community centre on another - initial talks but plans do not develop any further;
 
1988
Logo competition winner announced as the familiar pink triangle of 'The Out House Project';
Considered renting a small property in Shakespeare Street;
First year of Pride coaches with 'In flight' meals provided. Eyes down for Bingo on the M1 with live link by intercom throughout the fleet !;
Hopton Cottage weekend in Derbyshire;
Visit to Edward Carpenter's house and Ruskin's farm near Sheffield;
Walkabout in Lace Market area of Nottingham to look for suitable space to rent;
 
1989
'Railway ramble' around Nottingham;
Regular meetings at Pennyfeathers Café commence;
Visit to Manchester Gay Centre to research the recently completed purpose built premises;
 
1990
Investigations into setting up a Housing Co-op

1991
Second Edward Carpenter ramble near Sheffield;
Holiday weekend in Reeth, North Yorkshire;
 
1992
Discussions to lease premises on Canal Street at £3,000 per annum;
Visit to Oxford Gay Community Centre;
December: assets exceed £11,000;

1993
Grant from Nottingham County Council - £600;
May: The Society ceases to pay interest on 'Loan Units';

1994
Anonymous donation of £40,000 received;
Advice and advocacy project developed;
Edward Carpenter centenary;
Initial discussions on purchasing a building as local authority grants appear more unlikely;
Tenders for Café Co-op invited;
T&GWU building at 259, Mansfield Road becomes available;
First business plan developed with the help of Notts Co-op Development Agency; £79,000 total sum required, therefore a mortgage of £21,000 needed:
December: Assets exceed £45,000;

1995
January: Detailed investigations and consultations with membership to purchase the T&GWU building at 259, Mansfield Road, Nottingham for £63,000;
Followed by the eventual decision, a few months later, not to proceed with the purchase of 259, Mansfield Road;
Grant awards: Nottinghamshire Health Authority £2,450, Nottinghamshire County Council £1,500 for the pilot 'Welfair Project';
Launch of Out House internet site;
Discussions with 'The Admiral Duncan' concerning a possible venture with adjoining property of 72-80, Lower Parliament Street;
December: Assets exceed £51,000;

1996
October: Membership instruct committee to pursue lease of 3 - 9, Hockley;
'Fourth Action' win tender to develop business plan to lease a building, to conduct a feasibility study for the café and to advise on issues around recruitment;
Investigations reveal charitable status not possible as a co-operative society, so a long haul ensues to change the status of the society to that of an Industrial and Provident society;
Membership reaches 320;
December: Assets exceed £65,000;

1997
March: Grant award of £500 from Nottingham County Council Social Services;
March: Grant award of £500 from Nottingham Co-operative Development Agency to assist in registration as an Industrial and Provident Society;
Transition to and Registration as an Industrial and Provident Society (for the benefit of the community) with limited liability;
Chris Bristow advises from Nottingham City Council in his role as Community Development Worker;
'Fourth Action' prepare Business Plan 1998 - 2001 : Capital £159,000, Revenue £213,000;
2,600 hits on Out House website;
December: Landlords decide to pull out of final lease arrangements on 3 - 9, Hockley despite planning permission granted for change of use;

1998
March: £228,000 Lottery Grant awarded;
April: 2,932 hits on website;
May: Transfer of assets from the original Out House Community Centre Co-operative Society to the new Out House Community Centre Limited (Registered as an Industrial and Provident Society) detailed in the Transfer Agreement;
June: Assets exceed £58,000;
October: Jackie Frith appointed as Development Worker;

1999
February: Lease of 15 - 23 Chapel Bar, Nottingham almost at completion, vendors pull out;
April: Decision to offer to purchase Cranbrook Street / Lennox Street building subject to planning approval;
June: Offer accepted with £5,000 non - refundable deposit, subject to planning permission;
Architects advise 3 phase development; Phase 1: £35,650, Phase 2: £130,300, Phase 3: £71,250, Total: £237,200;
October: Purchase of Cranbrook Street / Lennox Street building completed for £95,000;
 
2000
Contractors for Phase 1 appointed;
Phase 1 of building conversion completed;
Open Day for community to view building;
December: Jackie Frith resigns as Development worker

2001
April: Mark Simons appointed as Office Administrator (15 hours per week);
May: Chris Bristow appointed as Development Worker (22 ½ hours per week);

2002
May: Home Office Active Communities awards grant of nearly £100.000
Summer: Bookfairs held monthly in uncompleted building
August: Biddy McMeel becomes first full time Out House Volunteer Coordinator
September: Peter Tatchell gives keynote address AGM held at NG1.

2003
January: Boots charitable trust awards grant of £6000.
May: A Special General Meeting is held. The membership votes to dispose of the Cranbrook Street premises because all attempts to raise funds to refurbish it had failed. A proposal to lease premises for a community cafe in the Hockley area is overwhelmimgly approved.
October: As a first step, a community evening is starting in a local bar.

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